Family Social Support, Acceptance of Diabetes and Self-care Behavior as Influences on Glycemic Control and Quality of Life Among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Region 10

posted Apr 14, 2018, 4:09 PM by BND Admin
Family Social Support, Acceptance of Diabetes and Self-care Behavior as Influences on Glycemic Control and Quality of Life Among Adults with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Region 10

Annie Paclar Jacalan
Silliman University

Abstract

This study sought to find out among adults with Type 2 diabetes mellitus their extent of family social support, level of acceptance of diabetes, and degree of self-care behavior and how these variables influenced their extent of glycemic control, and level of quality of life. 
Descriptive and exploratory methods of research design were employed to examine the correlations between selected pairs of variables utilizing eighty seven diabetes patients from seven cities in Region 10 as the respondents of the study.  There were four standard survey questionnaires used: the Diabetes Quality of Life (DQOL); the Diabetes Social Support Questionnaire-Family Version (DSSQ-Family); the Self Care Inventory Revised Version (SCI-R); and Ideas About Diabetes Revisited (IAD-R).
Parametric test statistics for comparisons and relationships such as t-test, analysis of variance (ANOVA), the Pearson’s product moment correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis were employed to treat the variables.
Data analysis yielded the following conclusions: diabetic patients had a moderately good quality of life in spite of poor glycemic control; regardless of only fair family social support and self-care behavior, diabetic patients still had a moderately good quality of life; diabetic type 2 patients had a fairly good quality of life as determined by their ethnic origin and type of treatment received ; the type of treatment received had significant bearing on glycemic control and acceptance of diabetes; family social support was only fairly given to the diabetic patients so they performed self care sometimes only; and diabetic patients in certain types of occupation who were experiencing health complications and undergoing certain types of treatment  needed more family social support.  
The findings and conclusions of this study have drawn these recommendations: Implications for nursing- practice. Nurses must be able to provide nursing health education to address the basic components of self care in diabetes treatment regimen; education- the implementation of the diabetes nursing health education in the curriculum must be strictly followed by students in their related learning experience; a similar study to this present one be conducted in another setting to generate other factors that may influence the quality of life of diabetic clients.

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