A Mixed Method Study on the Doctoral Programs for Nurses in the Philippines: Perceived Importance, Impact, Challenges, Changes, Chances and Choices

A Mixed Method Study on the Doctoral Programs for Nurses in the Philippines: Perceived Importance, Impact, Challenges, Changes, Chances and Choices 

Kenneth P. Veluya, MSN, RN, PhD

Abstract:

At our contemporary days nurses play or portray diverse roles. This diversity in roles is influenced by complex health care system, medical advancement and technological breakthrough, and changes in government policy. All these issues
become the antecedents for the worldwide demand for nurses who are doctorally prepared. But research reports that there is an increasing inadequacy of nurses who are taking up doctoral degrees. Therefore, this study aimed to determine the perceived importance, impact, challenges, changes, chances, and choices of the doctoral programs in nursing among 132 doctorate nurses working as nurse leaders, educators, and researchers utilizing a researcher-made questionnaire and an interview guide. The content analysis mixed-method approach was used in order to address the various research goals. Descriptive - evaluative, descriptive - comparative, and descriptive – correlational research designs were utilized in the quantitative approach, while the phenomenological design was applied in the qualitative approach. Frequency,
percentage, weighted mean, standard deviation, Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis Test, Spearman rho, and Simple Linear Regression analysis were utilized in treating statistically quantitative data using SPSS, while NVivo software was used in the qualitative part utilizing content analysis.

Result shows that the doctoral programs in nursing is very important in; leadership and (x̄=3.90), research (x̄=3.88), policy making (x̄=3.86), management professional identity (x̄=3.83), and patient care (x̄=3.73); and it can also impact their
professional competencies regarding quality improvement (x̄=3.86), evidence-based practice (x̄=3.85), interprofessional teamwork (x̄=3.74), advanced care nursing (x̄=3.72), and use of information technology (x̄=3.67). Among the differences on perceived importance against profiles; significant differences were determined on patient care as to; age (ρ=0.001), institution attended the doctoral program (ρ=0.044), doctoral degree earned (ρ=0.005), major area (ρ=0.045) and practice area pre doctoral program (ρ=0.012). Research as to; age (ρ=0.001), institution attended the doctoral program (ρ=0.009), doctoral degree earned (ρ=0.002), major area (ρ=0.007) and practice area pre doctoral program (ρ=0.019). Leadership and management as to; age (ρ=0.001), institution attended the doctoral program (ρ=0.019), doctoral degree earned (ρ=0.024), and practice area pre doctoral program (ρ=0.028). Policy making as to; institution attended the doctoral program (ρ=0.045), and doctoral degree earned (ρ=0.013). professional identity as to; age (ρ=0.006), institution attended the doctoral program (ρ=0.016), doctoral degree earned (ρ=0.003), and major are (ρ=0.015).

Among the differences on perceived impact against profiles; significant differences were elicited on evidence-based practice as to; age (ρ=0.001), institution attended the doctoral program (ρ=0.008), doctoral degree earned (ρ=0.002), major area (ρ=0.010) and practice area pre doctoral program (ρ=0.037). Advanced care nursing and age (ρ=0.008). Quality improvement as to; age (ρ=0.002), institution attended the doctoral program (ρ=0.010), doctoral degree earned (ρ=0.013), and major area (ρ=0.048). Use of information technology and age (ρ=0.011).

There is a significant relationship between the perceived level of importance as to patient care and perceived impact of the doctoral programs in nursing. The importance which has the significant effect on impact are those concerning; patient care
(ρ=0.001), professional identity (ρ=0.001), and research (ρ=0.001), with all their p –values recorded at less than the 0.01 level of significance.

The participants have experienced time management, financial, and program requirements challenges; professional, personal, and social changes; encountered opportunities for higher position, increase in salary, and role expansion; and considered decisions such as; improvement of self, responsibility to contribute to the profession, and need to help others on their pursuit of the doctoral degree in nursing.
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